FIRST Robotics Competition

What’s FRC?
FIRST® Robotics Competition teams are responsible for designing, building, and programming their robots to compete in an alliance format against other teams. The robot kit is reusable from year-to-year and is programmed using a variety of languages.

Teams, including coaches, mentors, and volunteers, are required to develop strategy and build robots based on sound engineering principles. Awards are given for the competition as well as for community outreach, design, and other real-world accomplishments.

 About FRC (FIRST® Robotics Competition)
FRC is designed for students in grades 7-12 to compete head to head, using a sports model. Teams are responsible for designing, building, and programming their robots to compete in an alliance format against other teams. The robot kit is reusable from year-to-year and is programmed using a variety of languages. Teams, including coaches, mentors, and volunteers, are required to develop strategy and build robots based on sound engineering principles. Awards are given for the competition as well as for community outreach, design, and other real-world accomplishments.
2017 Game | FIRST Steamworks

STEAMWORKS invites two adventurers’ clubs, in an era where steam power reigns, to prepare their airships for a long distance race.

Each three team alliance prepares in three ways:
1.Builds team pressure.
Robots collect fuel (balls) and score it in their boiler via high and
low efficiency goals. Boilers turn fuel into steam pressure which is stored in the steam tank on their airship -but it takes more fuel in the low efficiency goal to build steam than the high efficiency goal.
2.Start rotors.
Robots deliver gears to pilots on their airship for installation. Once the gear
train is complete, they turn the crank to start the rotor.
3.Prepare for flight.
Robots must latch on to their airship before launch (the end of the
match) by ascending their ropes to signal that they’re ready for takeoff

first stronghold
2016 Game | FIRST Stronghold

STRONGHOLD is played by two alliances of three teams each. Alliances compete against each other to breach their opponents’ defenses, known as outer works, and capture their tower. They score points by crossing elements of their opponents’ outer works, and capture their tower. They score points by crossing elements of their opponents’ outer works, scoring boulders in their opponents’ tower goals, and surrounding and scaling their opponents’ tower itself.

 Recycle-Rush-1024x505
2015 Game | Recycle Rush
RECYCLE RUSH is a recycling-themed game played by two Alliances of three robots each. Robots score points by stacking totes on
scoring platforms, capping those stacks with recycling containers, and properly disposing of pool noodles, representing litter. In keeping
with the recycling theme of the game, all game pieces used are reusable or recyclable by teams in their home locations or by FIRST at the
end of the season.
AERIAL ASSIST is played by two competing Alliances of three robots each on a flat 25’ x 54’ foot field, straddled by a truss suspended
just over five feet above the floor. The objective is to score as many balls in goals as possible during a two (2)-minute and 30-second match.
The more Alliances score their ball in their goals, and the more they work together to do it, the more points their Alliance receives. The
match begins with one 10-second Autonomous Period in which robots operate independently of driver. Each robot may begin with a ball
and attempt to score it in a goal. Alliances earn bonus points for scoring balls in this mode and for any of their robots that move in to their
zones. Additionally, each high/low pair of goals will be designated “hot” for five seconds, but the order of which side is first is randomized.
For each ball scored in a “hot” goal, the Alliance earns additional bonus points. For the rest of the match, drivers remotely control robots
from behind a protective wall. Once all balls in autonomous are scored, only one ball is re-entered in to play, and the Alliances must cycle
a single ball as many times as possible for the remainder of the match. With the single ball, they try to maximize their points earned by
throwing balls over the truss, catching balls launched over the truss, and scoring in the high and low goals on the far side of the field.
Alliances receive large bonuses for “assists,” which are earned for each robot that has possession of the ball in a zone as the ball moves
down the field.
2013 Game | Ultimate Ascent
ULTIMATE ASCENT is played by two competing alliances on a flat, 27 x 54 foot field. Each Alliance consists of three robots, and they
compete to score as many discs into their goals as they can during a two (2)-minute and fifteen (15)-second match. The higher the goal in
which the disc is scored, the more points the Alliance receives.The match begins with a fifteen (15)-second Autonomous Period in which
robots operate independently of driver inputs. Discs scored during this period are worth additional points. For the remainder of the match,
drivers control robots and try to maximize their alliance score by scoring as many goals as possible.The match ends with robots attempting
to climb up pyramids located near the middle of the field. Each robot earns points based on how high it climbs.
2012 Game | Rebound Rumble
REBOUND RUMBLE is played by two competing alliances on a flat, 27 x 54 ft field. Each alliance consists of three robots. They compete
to score as many basketballs into their hoops as they can during a 2 minute and 15 second match. The higher the hoop in which the basketball
is scored, the more points the alliance receives.
The match begins with a 15-second Hybrid Period in which robots operate independently of driver inputs. During this Hybrid Period, one
robot on each alliance may be controlled using a Microsoft Kinect. Baskets scored during this period are worth 3 extra points. For the remainder
of the match, drivers control robots and try to maximize their alliance score by scoring as many baskets as possible. Baskets are worth 3, 2, or 1
point in the top, middle, and low hoops, respectively.
The match ends with robots attempting to balance on bridges located at the middle of the field. In Qualification Matches, a robot from each
alliance will also try to balance on the white CoopertitionTM bridge to score additional ranking points for each alliance. Scoring for the match
is summarized below. One robot balanced is worth 10 points, two is worth 20 points, and three is worth 40 points (only in elimination matches).
Portions of the information on this page were taken from the FIRST website